WPL100: Top 100 Tools for Workplace Learning 2019

Here are the Top 100 digital tools and services that are used to design, deliver, enable and/or support learning at work. The number in brackets beside each tool is their position on the Top 200 tools list. Underneath this table is some analysis of what this list (and supporting comments) shows about the current state of workplace learning.

PowerPoint (3) 2 Google Search (2) 3 YouTube (1) 4 Word (7)
5 Microsoft Teams (11) 6 Slack (12) 7 Zoom (10) 8 Google Docs/Drive (6)
9 Excel (16) 10 Articulate (20) 11 Wikipedia (8) 12 OneNote (22)
13 Skype (19) 14 WordPress (9) 15 LinkeIn (5) 16 LinkedIn Learning (13)
17 Dropbox (17) 18 Camtasia (23) 19 Twitter (4) 20 Kahoot (21)
21 Snagit (27) 22 Trello (28) 23 SharePoint (33) 24 Canva (34)
25 Yammer (36) 26 Adobe Captivate (37) 27 Outlook (38) 28 iSpring (40)
29 Mentimeter (41) 30 WhatsApp (14) 31 Easygenerator (42) 32 Google Forms (26)
33 Adobe Photoshop (44) 34 Prezi (47) 35 Audacity (49) 36 OneDrive (55)
37 H5P (57) 38 HiHaHo (59) 39 Workplace by Facebook (60) NEW 40 Webex (64)
41 TED (24) 42 Degreed (65) 43 Vimeo (66) 44 Moodle (50)
45 Powtoon (67) 46 Confluence (68) 47 Anders Pink (69) 48 Genially (73)
49 Vyond (75) 50 Adobe InDesign (80) 51 Evernote (25) 52 Adobe Connect (81)
53 Adobe Spark (82) 54 IsEazy (85) 55 Adobe Premiere (86) 56 Adobe Acrobat Pro (88)
57 Google Hangouts Meet (93) 58 Adobe Illustrator (95) 59 Biteable (96) NEW 60 Google Chrome (35)
61 Udemy (29) 62 G-Suite (98) 63 Adobe After Effects (99) 64 Adobe Audition (104)
65 Glide (109) NEW 66 Survey Monkey (97) 67 Jamboard (113) NEW 68 Moovly (117)
69 Appear.in (124) 70 Totara (126) 71 Axonify (128) 72 Microsoft Stream (129)
73 Gmail (46) 74 Lectora (135) 75 Poll Everywhere (62) 76 Sway (94)
77 GoToMeeting (140) 78 aNewSpring (141) 79 Mailchimp (143) 80 Evolve (144)
81 Mind Tools (151) NEW 82 Elucidat (152) BACK 83 Coursera (53) 84 Padlet (30)
85 Pixabay (111) 86 Gomo (161) 87 Screencast-O-matic (92) 88 Apple Keynote (74)
89 Blackboard (130) 90 Glisser (162) 91 Microsoft Edge (167) 92 Jive (168)
93 Bing (172) 94 Edcast (179) NEW 95 Cronycle (180) NEW 96 Filtered  (181) NEW
97 Docebo (182) NEW 98 Microsoft Forms (106) 99 SAP SuccessFactors (184) NEW 100 SlidePresenter (187) NEW

Analysis

In the analysis of the PPL100 (Top 100 Tools for Personal & Professional Learning), I explained  the 4 D’s model of modern learning. If we apply this model to the WPL100 list we can see how these tools are being used to support modern learning in the workplace.

  1. DIDACTICS – The vast majority of tools on the list are focused around TRAINING (in its broadest sense), ie designing delivering and managing things for people to learn from.
    • Whilst course authoring tools still dominate, there are now a wide range of other asset development tools in use, from the sophisticated Adobe stable (e.g. Photoshopand InDesign) to basic documentation and presentation tools like Word and PowerPoint, to create simpler types of resources (as this comment shows).

“I often use PowerPoint to produce content to share, like eBooks, slide docs, presentations, simple infographics and PDF files. It’s easier to do a layout with graphics in PowerPoint than in Word “

      • Some organisations are now providing libraries of online courses to their people; the most popular of which is LinkedIn Learning …

“Content galore, downloadable, mostly credible SMEs delivering, a growing library in the L&D space,”

    • A number of learning platforms appear on this year’s WPL100 list too, but these do vary considerably from the traditional LMS/course management systems to micro-learning platforms and learning experience platforms (LXPs) that offer a quite different (and personalised) experience, e.g. Degreed (as this comment shows)

“This platform (and those like it) is changing the face of L&D through enabling user curation, putting a better face (UI) on L&D, and consolidating content across platforms.”

    • However, there is increasing evidence that in the move from courses to resources, hosting of those resources is now taking place outside of the LMS where it is more easily accessible, e.g. on the intranet such as SharePoint, as this comment shows.

“I have been using SharePoint, with the help of a custom HTML editor (Wix-style), to provide web based content instead of eLearning modules. This is giving my team more flexibility to create and maintain our content, and gives our people more flexibility to access the content when and where they need it.”

  1. DISCOVERY  – When it comes to INFORMAL LEARNING, only a few web specific resources appear on the list, rather there seems to be more focus on implementing curation platforms to automate this process for employees (rather than encouraging their own self-discovery to solve problems and themselves keep up to date). Key curation platforms are  Anders Pink and Cronycle.
  2. DISCOURSE – SOCIAL LEARNING & COLLABORATION has become much more valued in recent years as a way of learning, and this year a large number of team collaboration platforms appear on the list.  Workplace by Facebook appears on the list for the first time, but more significantly, Microsoft Teams has overtaken Slack this year, and this may well be the future for the next few years, as this comment suggests.

“I expect MS Teams is going to take over internal platforms over the next few years. It simply works as a tool to cooperate, share and communicate.””

  1. DOING (the day job) – In the workplace, the Microsoft ecosystem (Teams, Yammer, OneNote, OneDrive, Stream) has now taken a firm hold and underpins a complete environment to support DAILY WORK and learning. Learning and working are beginning to be seen as inseparable partners.

The graphic below plots the WPL100 tools around these 4 key learning areas.

wp100-2019

Want to find out more, visit
Modern Workplace Learning 2019:
A Framework for Continuous Improvement, Learning & Development