14 – WordPress

UP 7 PLACES IN 2022

WordPress is used by individuals and organizations for blogging, but also to create fully-functioning websites.

Website: wordpress.org and wordpress.com
Cost: Free. Open source
Availability: Hosted (at .com) or Download (at .org)

Rankings in the previous surveys: 

2021: 21 2020: 14 2019: 9 2018: 8 2017: 9 2016: 9 2015: 8 2014: 6
2013: 8 2012: 5 2011:  5 2010: 8 2009: 6 2008: 5 2007: 6

Comments on WordPress in 2022

“A reliable tool to clarify and share my learning and work in the flow of life. Deep thoughts. Achievements. Work in progress. Research. Owning my data. I have also added lately my archive page of all the posts I published, produced and curated. I also use a Creative Commons license on my website and blog to share my craft.” Rotana Ty, Learning & Community Analyst, France

“Though I dislike the new block editor, I continue to enjoy the ease of writing using this blog platform, and I am discovering a number of tools for converting WordPress documents to other publishable formats.” David Simpson, retired Professor, USA

“You’ll notice that I have been writing a post per day – sometimes two. Getting off social media has allowed my mind to expand a bit more where I just want to write to get the stuff out of it.” Helen Blunden, Continual and Lifelong Learner, Australia

“WordPress has been where I hang my online hat since 2007. Great option for creating a website – it is quick and easy to work with and I’ve never had any issues.” Mike Taylor, Learning Design & Technology Consultant, USA

“I use it to create course sites, help learners create portfolios, and host materials from research studies, among many other things.” Colin Midland, Educator, technology steward, Australia

“My blogging tool, is a major part of my learning process. In meeting my commitment of at least a post a week, I’m motivating myself to continue to explore new topics.” Clark Quinn, USA

“The Teaching in Higher Ed website has been on a hosted WordPress site for so long, I can’t even remember where it resided prior to WordPress. My friend and web developer, Naomi Kasa, has helped keep the site beautiful and functional. One of my favorite features of the site is the page Naomi created with all my upcoming and past speaking engagements. It is great having all that information in one place and to see the collection of resources keep growing over time. Take a look at my resources page for a recent speaking engagementand how I embedded a Canva presentation, which includes use of embedded content and video.” Bonni Stachowiak, producer and host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, USA

“For the last 13 years I’ve posted one, occasionally two, blog posts per week on the privately hosted WordPress website you’re reading now. Sharing my thoughts by writing about interesting things is probably the best way I learn.” Adrian Segar, Author, Conferences that work, USA

Previous comments on WordPress

“I use WordPress to blog. My weblog is my most important learning tool. I blog to process what I see and read, to reflect, to share knowledge and as an archive. My blogposts are thoughts under construction. I started to blog with Typepad. I use WordPress since December 2011. Most of the feedback I receive via LinkedIn, nowadays.” Wilfred Rubens, E-Learning Advisor, Netherlands, 2021

“A reliable tool to clarify and share my learning and work in the flow of life. Deep thoughts. Achievements. Work in progress. Research. Owning my data. I have also added lately my archive page of all the posts I published, produced and curated.” Rotana Ty, Learning Catalyst, France, 2021

“It’s my online space and portfolio of all my work and thinking” Helen Blunden, Community Manager, Australia, 2021

“WordPress has been where I hang my online hat since 2007. Great option for creating a website – it is quick and easy to work with and I’ve never had any issues. (Although with the #NoCode movement gaining momentum, I’m seriously looking at Webflow, if there is a painless way to change. If I were starting from scratch, that is where I’d go.)” Mike Taylor, Consultant, USA, 2021

“The obvious reason that WordPress is important to us is that it provided Brian and opportunity to start this blog. When we started to struggle with how to post course content and other resources for clients, we went back to WordPress. When we wanted to change the marketing experience of Soapbox so we separated out the marketing site and I created a new site in one weekend. When wanted to build a resource for learning & development professionals to support Brian’s book, we turned to WordPress again. I’m always stunned by how many things you can do with WordPress. If you think about building a custom site, consider searching the plugins on WordPress to see if someone has already created that functionality.” Tim Waxenfelter, USA, 2021

“Helps with development, training, communication, and is flexible, adaptable, and continually evolving.” Training director, USA, 2021

“Best blog tool and business website combined. Extensive templates, plugins and widgets. Choice of editor for ease of use.” CoachCarole, Author, Teacher, Course designer, Genealogist, Australia, 2021

“WordPress has been my tool of choice for blogging for nearly 15 years. This is the place I do most of my personal reflective learning. Frequently, I don’t know what I really think about a topic until I write about it. Writing helps me connect ideas and clarifies my understanding. In addition, my blog is a place where I try to help others learn. When I “work out loud” and demonstrate how I accomplished something, others can read and benefit from that. When readers email me or comment about how helpful something was, I know I’m meeting that goal too. New clients find me through my blog. If they read something I wrote and find it helpful, they already trust my expertise before they even contact me.” Christy Tucker, USA, 2021

“We use a WordPress system as a blogging platform for our students. I like its versatility and it’s very popular as a formative, journal or e-portfolio-like space in our course” Lee Lewis, Senior Digital Learning Coordinator, UK, 2021

“Reliable tool to clarify and share my learning / working out loud. Deep thoughts. Research. Owning my data.” Rotana Ty, Learning Catalyst. Internal Community Manager, France, 2020

“Since several years on number 1. I use WordPress to blog. My weblog is my most important learning tool. I blog to process what I see and read, to reflect, to share knowledge and as an archive. My blogposts are thoughts under construction. I started to blog with Typepad. I use WordPress since December 2011. Most of the feedback I receive via LinkedIn, nowadays.” Wilfred Rubens, Netherlands, 2020

“WordPress powers my personal website/blog serves and connects via Zapier with Mailchimp to power my weekly newsletter” Mike Taylor, USA, 2020

“Longer form personal reflection and record keeping.” Ian Gardner, Online Learning and Development Coordinator, Switzerland, 2020

“WordPress is the platform I use to power all my websites. I make use of a large number of plugins that enhance its default functionality and appearance.” Jane Hart, 2020

“Powers my blog (+3,300 posts), which is the core of my sense-making. It’s easy to use, has a huge community, and there are many plug-ins and additions available. I also use it to deliver my online PKM workshop.” Harold Jarche, Canada, 2020

“I use WordPress not only as a publishing platform but also as a way to think outloud and store a record of what we are doing and why for future reference and archiving. Offering the multisite version for our faculty and students provides many opportunities for learning and sharing.” Audrey J Williams, Vice President, IT/CIO, USA, 2020

“Writing is arguably the top way I reflect. And, so that’d put Microsoft Word at the top of my list. That’s where I write books and articles first. And, of course WordPress is how I write my blog (e.g. here!).  Writing is a way to sort out how I think about things. As I say, things that end up in presentations and books tend to show up on blog first. Well, one of the main ways.” Clark Quinn, USA, 2020

Quick Guide to WordPress 

Here you will find some basic guidance and links to resources on how to use WordPress for teaching, training, learning and development.

Individuals make use of WordPress.com as an easy-to-use platform for personal or professional blogging

    • Here’s how to set up your blog with WordPress: the ultimate guide, MakeUseOf, 24 January 2018
    • It can also be used to create a learning log or work journal which rely on chronological postings.
    • It is also a useful place to host your professional portfolio

At work and in education WordPress is also used in a number of ways to create both blogs and websites

    • as it has the facility to create pages not just blog posts, this means it can be used to build a complete website on a topic or to act as a “portal” for learning resources
    • and by using a combination of pages and posts, WordPress can therefore be used to create a number of other training or educational resources:

A training blog might be used to create a continuous flow of training tips or resources, or even a series of lessons

  • Blog posts support user comments, so this provide opportunities for discussion of the content amongst readers.
  • Content can all be scheduled in advance and published on defined dates
  • Although the content the content will be released on a daily basis, it will build into a valuable body of on demand knowledge over time.

An educational website might provide access to course lessons as well as supporting resources

Further resources


Last updated: August 29, 2022 at 6:37 am

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